More than 940 children have died in hot cars since 1998. Here's how to prevent more hot car deaths

According to the Strong 4 Life Program at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, if it's 75 degrees out, it takes 30 minutes for the inside of car to reach 104 degrees.

Gillian Neff and Rose Shannon

Jun 11, 2023, 4:53 PM

Updated 342 days ago

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Doctors tell News 12 that no matter the temperature, the inside of a car can heat up fast with potentially deadly consequences.
According to the Strong 4 Life Program at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, if it's 75 degrees out, it takes 30 minutes for the inside of car to reach 104 degrees. Rolling down a window or parking in the shade does little to lower the temperature.
Those temperatures can be dangerous for anyone, especially young children.
"Their temperatures can rise about three to five times faster than adults," says Dr. Sarah Lazarus. "In addition, young babies and toddlers, they don't sweat as much so they can't distribute that heat."
As a result, doctors advise people not to leave anyone in the car.
Since 1998, more than 940 children have died after being left or trapped in a hot car, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
"Usually that's because their routine changed, so dad may typically drop off a child but instead mom was dropping off the child at day care and she forgot. She just went on to work. Closed the car door and went upstairs to her office," says Lazarus.
One preventative measure is for day care centers and schools to check in with parents if their child is late or not there that day.
Experts say always check the backseat before locking the door. Leaving something such as cellphone next to the car seat can also be helpful.


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