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The New Normal: How can you keep your family safe if there's a COVID-19 winter surge?

News 12's Elizabeth Hashagen was joined by Dr. Matthew Harris to talk about concerns over a winter COVID-19 surge and what it could mean for in-person get-togethers.

News 12 Staff

Nov 16, 2021, 2:53 PM

Updated 946 days ago

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News 12's Elizabeth Hashagen was joined by Dr. Matthew Harris to talk about concerns over a winter COVID-19 surge and what it could mean for in-person get-togethers.
Drugmaker Pfizer Inc. has signed a deal with a U.N.-backed group to allow other manufacturers to make its experimental COVID-19 pill, a move that could make the treatment available to more than half of the world's population.
The company said treatment reduced the risk of hospitalization or death by 89% when given within three days of symptoms appearing. The drug hasn't received regulatory approval in the U.S. yet, but Pfizer says it plans to seek authorization as soon as possible.
Federal health officials fear a possible COVID-19 winter surge as more people move their activities indoors. New cases rose 23% in the past two weeks.
Dr. Dave Chokshi, the commissioner of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, announced that he's issuing a commissioner's advisory to all health care providers to ensure there are no barriers for New Yorkers to get a COVID-19 booster shot if they are over 18 and at least six months since their second Pfizer or Moderna shot or two months since a Johnson & Johnson shot.
California, Colorado and New Mexico — are allowing COVID-19 booster shots for all adults, even though federal health officials recommend limiting shots to patients considered most at risk. The three states have some of the nation's highest rates of new COVID infections.
Now that COVID-19 vaccine boosters are dominating the conversation when it comes to staying protected, pregnant people may be wondering if they should get the extra dose. Too few expectant parents are getting vaccinated against COVID-19 in the first place — only one-third of the pregnant population has gotten the shot or two-shot series. The immunity of expectant moms is weakened.
What side effects should pregnant women expect from a booster?
What about testing for the holidays? How can you keep your family safe?


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