The New Normal: What are the short-term and long-term consequences of the vaccine?

News 12's Elizabeth Hashagen was joined by Dr. Sharon Nachman to discuss the COVID-19 vaccine rollout for children ages 5 to 11.

News 12 Staff

Nov 9, 2021, 3:27 PM

Updated 924 days ago

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News 12's Elizabeth Hashagen was joined by Dr. Sharon Nachman to discuss the COVID-19 vaccine rollout for children ages 5 to 11.
What are the short-term consequences of the vaccine? Will it hurt? What are the side effects?
Many parents want to know if they can get their child immunized from the flu at the same time they are receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. What should parents know?
One safety concern has been the risk of myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle, and pericarditis, the inflammation around the heart, which has appeared occasionally in younger adults who received the vaccine. What should parents know?
A study found that household contact transmission of the delta variant had a 70% increase compared with alpha in nearly 6,000 genomic sequenced cases with matched controls. Even among households, fully vaccinated people are significantly less likely to transmit.
Many immunocompromised Americans, including people with cancer, autoimmune disorders and transplanted organs, are awaiting what could be their ticket back to some semblance of normalcy: the ability to receive periodic injections of long-acting monoclonal antibodies. This, research suggests, could provide them the substantial protection against COVID-19 that in their cases the vaccination may not.
What are the long-term consequences of the vaccine?


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