Ulster County confirms first case of mpox

Smith said in prepared remarks that the county has “been monitoring the spread of Mpox cases in New York State” and encouraged at-risk populations to get the Jynneos vaccine.

Bob Doda

Aug 6, 2022, 11:45 PM

Updated 718 days ago

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Ulster County confirmed its first case of mpox, Commissioner of Health Dr. Carol Smith said Saturday in a news release.
Smith said that the county has “been monitoring the spread of monkeypox cases in New York State” and encouraged at-risk populations to get the Jynneos vaccine.
According to Smith:
“We have been engaged in a public awareness campaign to share information about monkeypox through social media and public service announcements. We also have access to treatment through the State for severe cases. If you believe you have been exposed to monkeypox , contact a healthcare provider. Medical providers should reach out to the Ulster County Department of Health if a suspected case of monkeypox comes to their attention.”
Mpox facts from the Ulster County Department of Health:
Monkeypox symptoms can include:
  • Rashes, bumps or blisters on or around the genitals or in other areas like hands, feet, chest or face.
  • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, muscle aches, chills and fatigue. These symptoms may occur before or after the rash appears, or not at all.
Currently, New York State guidelines limit mpox vaccine eligibility to individuals who meet the following criteria:
  • Individuals with recent exposure to a suspected or confirmed mpox case within the past 14 days.
  • Those at high risk of a recent exposure to mpox, including gay men and members of the bisexual, transgender, and gender non-conforming community and other communities of men who have sex with men and who have engaged
  • in intimate or skin-to-skin contact with others in the past 14 days areas where mpox is spreading.
  • Individuals who have had skin-to-skin contact with someone in a social network experiencing mpox activity.
Editor's note: 'Monkeypox' has been changed to 'mpox' in this article after it was initially published to adhere to updated WHO guidelines.  The original 'monkeypox' name was not changed in instances of direct quotes or social media posts. 


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