NY takes another step in fight against opioid crisis after reaching deal with Purdue Pharma

New York is one of 15 states that reached a deal with Purdue Pharma and the Sackler family, the makers of the prescription painkiller OxyContin, over their role in fueling the nation's opioid epidemic.

News 12 Staff

Jul 9, 2021, 12:25 AM

Updated 1,072 days ago

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New York is taking another step in its fight against the opioid crisis after reaching a deal with the controversial company that makes oxycodone.
New York is one of 15 states that reached a deal with Purdue Pharma and the Sackler family, the makers of the prescription painkiller OxyContin, over their role in fueling the nation's opioid epidemic.
The company and its executives are accused of misleading the public and doctors about just how addictive their drug really is.
New York is expected to get more than $200 million for drug treatment, prevention and recovery as part of a larger nationwide $4.5 billion settlement.
Some of that money could go to outpatient addiction treatment sites like The Counseling Center at Yorktown Heights.
"There's no amount of money that these pharmaceutical companies can pay to make up for all the thousands of loved ones, family members, community members that have lost their lives to this epidemic," says Dair Melendez-Drier, clinical director of the Counseling Center at Yorktown Heights.
More than 500,000 Americans have died from overdoses of prescription and illegal opioids since 1999, according to the CDC.
In 2018, Westchester joined other municipalities in suing Purdue Pharma as well.
"We are looking to recoup some of the costs that were spent by Westchester taxpayers in paying for Medicaid costs that could've been avoided if these companies were more forthcoming," says Westchester County Executive George Latimer.
Purdue Pharma can go forward with its bankruptcy restructuring plan, does not have to admit any wrongdoing, and is protected against future opioid-related lawsuits as part of the settlement reached by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in White Plains.
The drugmaker will also release more than 30 million previously private documents that prosecutors hope will shine a light on the company's role in hooking Americans to opioids.


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