State Supreme Court issues order blocking NYC from sending migrants to Dutchess County

A judge granted the county a temporary restraining order and is also requiring the city to cover the financial cost of the 86 migrants staying at the Red Roof Inn in Poughkeepsie.

News 12 Staff

May 24, 2023, 9:57 AM

Updated 369 days ago

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A state Supreme Court ruling now says migrants cannot be bused from New York City to Dutchess County for at least the next month.
A judge granted the county a temporary restraining order and is also requiring the city to cover the financial cost of the 86 migrants staying at the Red Roof Inn in Poughkeepsie.
Half of the men arrived in Poughkeepsie from the city over the last two days and the other half were transferred from the Knights Inn in Liberty, Sullivan County on Sunday.
Dutchess County Executive William F.X. O'Neil blasted New York City, Gov. Kathy Hochul, and the federal government for what he called "nonexistent communication" and a lack of resources to help those who are already housed in the county. "Dutchess County is trying to undo the wrongs that have been done to us by city, state, and federal governments."
This is the latest legal action to upend Adams' plan of relocating the overflow of asylum seekers from the city to the northern suburbs.
Rockland and Orange counties have both previously secured their injunctions.
The order will remain in effect until June 20, but the county is pursuing a permanent decision. O'Neil says he prefers to not house any asylum seekers but adds that he needs more resources if he is legally required to.
"We need to help them. If they're going to be here for the time they're going to be here -- to help them to be productive in our community."
In a statement to News 12, a press secretary for Mayor Eric Adams says the city will appeal the ruling. “New York City has cared for 70,000 asylum seekers — sheltering, feeding, and caring for them, and we have done so largely without incident. We need the federal government to step up, but until they do, we need other elected officials around the state and country to do their part. New York City is out of space and we’re only asking Dutchess County to manage approximately ¼ of 1% of the asylum seekers who have come to New York City, with New York paying for shelter, food, and services. Despite this county refusing to meet their moral mandate, many elected officials, community groups, and faith institutions have been overwhelmingly supportive and enthusiastic about welcoming these new New Yorkers to their cities and towns. We will be appealing this ruling.”

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