HEAT ALERT

Extreme heat blankets the region with heat advisory, air quality alert issued for the Hudson Valley

‘Sesame Street’ debuts Ji-Young, first Asian American muppet

At only 7 years old, Ji-Young is making history as the first Asian American muppet in the “Sesame Street” canon. She is Korean American and has two passions: rocking out on her electric guitar and skateboarding. The children’s TV program, which first aired 52 years ago this month, gave The Associated Press a first look at its adorable new occupant.

Associated Press

Nov 16, 2021, 12:46 AM

Updated 946 days ago

Share:

‘Sesame Street’ debuts Ji-Young, first Asian American muppet
What’s in a name? Well, for Ji-Young, the newest muppet resident of “Sesame Street,” her name is a sign she was meant to live there.
“So, in Korean traditionally the two syllables they each mean something different and Ji means, like, smart or wise. And Young means, like, brave or courageous and strong,” Ji-Young explained during a recent interview. “But we were looking it up and guess what? Ji also means sesame.”
At only 7 years old, Ji-Young is making history as the first Asian American muppet in the “Sesame Street” canon. She is Korean American and has two passions: rocking out on her electric guitar and skateboarding. The children’s TV program, which first aired 52 years ago this month, gave The Associated Press a first look at its adorable new occupant.
Ji-Young will formally be introduced in “See Us Coming Together: A Sesame Street Special.” Simu Liu, Padma Lakshmi and Naomi Osaka are among the celebrities appearing in the special, which will drop Thanksgiving Day on HBO Max, “Sesame Street” social media platforms and on local PBS stations.
Some of Ji-Young’s personality comes from her puppeteer. Kathleen Kim, 41 and Korean American, got into puppetry in her 30s. In 2014, she was accepted into a “Sesame Street” workshop. That evolved into a mentorship and becoming part of the team the following year. Being a puppeteer on a show Kim watched growing up was a dream come true. But helping shape an original muppet is a whole other feat.
“I feel like I have a lot of weight that maybe I’m putting on myself to teach these lessons and to be this representative that I did not have as a kid,” Kim said. But fellow puppeteer Leslie Carrara-Rudolph — who performs Abby Cadabby — reminded her, “It’s not about us ... It’s about this message.”
Ji-Young’s existence is the culmination of a lot of discussions after the events of 2020 — George Floyd’s death and anti-Asian hate incidents. Like a lot of companies, “Sesame Street” reflected on how it could “meet the moment,” said Kay Wilson Stallings, executive vice-president of Creative and Production for Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit organization behind “Sesame Street.”
Sesame Workshop established two task forces — one to look at its content and another to look at its own diversity. What developed was Coming Together, a multi-year initiative addressing how to talk to children about race, ethnicity and culture.
One result was 8-year-old Tamir. While not the show’s first Black muppet, he was one of the first used to talk about subjects like racism.
“When we knew we were going to be doing this work that was going to focus on the Asian and Pacific Islanders experience, we of course knew we needed to create an Asian muppet as well,” Stallings said.
These newer muppets — their personalities and their looks — were remarkably constructed in a matter of a months. The process normally takes at least a couple of years. There are outside experts and a cross-section of employees known as the “culture trust” who weigh in on every aspect of a new muppet, Stallings said.
For Kim, it was crucial that Ji-Young not be “generically pan-Asian.”
“Because that’s something that all Asian Americans have experienced. They kind of want to lump us into this monolithic ‘Asian,’” Kim said. “So it was very important that she was specifically Korean American, not just like, generically Korean, but she was born here.”
One thing Ji-Young will help teach children is how to be a good “upstander.” “Sesame Street” first used the term on its “The Power of We” TV special last year, which featured Tamir.
“Being an upstander means you point out things that are wrong or something that someone does or says that is based on their negative attitude towards the person because of the color of their skin or the language they speak or where they’re from,” Stallings said. “We want our audience to understand they can be upstanders.”
In “See Us Coming Together,” Sesame Street is preparing for Neighbor Day where everyone shares food, music or dance from their culture. Ji-Young becomes upset after a kid, off screen, tells her “to go back home,” an insult commonly flung at Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. But she feels empowered after Sesame Street’s other Asian American residents, guest stars and friends like Elmo assure her that she belongs as much as anyone else.


More from News 12
2:18
HEAT ALERT: Sizzling temperatures continue, heat advisory extended in the Hudson Valley

HEAT ALERT: Sizzling temperatures continue, heat advisory extended in the Hudson Valley

1:29
Police: 1 of 2 students involved in Bedford car crash dies from injuries

Police: 1 of 2 students involved in Bedford car crash dies from injuries

1:49
Yonkers police find no validity in alleged bomb threat

Yonkers police find no validity in alleged bomb threat

1:33
59-year-old Marlboro woman stabbed outside of watermelon truck in Newburgh

59-year-old Marlboro woman stabbed outside of watermelon truck in Newburgh

1:52
Asbestos discovery in East Ramapo schools prompts parents, NYCLU to rally

Asbestos discovery in East Ramapo schools prompts parents, NYCLU to rally

0:45
Veteran Westchester firefighter dies after two-year battle with 9/11-related cancer

Veteran Westchester firefighter dies after two-year battle with 9/11-related cancer

1:38
Poughkeepsie sustainable farmers race against heat to protect themselves, crops

Poughkeepsie sustainable farmers race against heat to protect themselves, crops

1:35
Carmel schools dismissing early for the week because of extreme heat

Carmel schools dismissing early for the week because of extreme heat

1:28
Emergency room doctor discusses how to prevent health issues related to high temps

Emergency room doctor discusses how to prevent health issues related to high temps

2:07
Hudson Valley braces for heat advisory, cooling centers open

Hudson Valley braces for heat advisory, cooling centers open

0:42
Danskammer Energy drops plan for new methane gas plant in Newburgh

Danskammer Energy drops plan for new methane gas plant in Newburgh

0:20
Parents, advocates rally to save East Ramapo schools after asbestos discovery

Parents, advocates rally to save East Ramapo schools after asbestos discovery

1:41
Police: Justin Timberlake charged with DWI in Sag Harbor

Police: Justin Timberlake charged with DWI in Sag Harbor

0:18
Fire engulfs car on Old Nyack Turnpike in Ramapo

Fire engulfs car on Old Nyack Turnpike in Ramapo

0:42
Headlines: Cold case guilty plea, Poughkeepsie crash injures 3

Headlines: Cold case guilty plea, Poughkeepsie crash injures 3

0:46
Dutchess County autism center receives $3 million in state funding

Dutchess County autism center receives $3 million in state funding

0:25
Mario Cuomo Bridge to shine blue and white for students who named falcon chicks

Mario Cuomo Bridge to shine blue and white for students who named falcon chicks

2:39
Made in the Hudson Valley: Loola Doola Boutique brings one-of-a-kind, handmade clutches to Westchester County

Made in the Hudson Valley: Loola Doola Boutique brings one-of-a-kind, handmade clutches to Westchester County

14:52:13
13 cool tips to help you stay healthy during the summer heat

13 cool tips to help you stay healthy during the summer heat

2:04
John Oliver eats giant Deising's cake bear, pledges $10K donation to Peoples' Place of Kingston, NY

John Oliver eats giant Deising's cake bear, pledges $10K donation to Peoples' Place of Kingston, NY