Some Muslim Americans say they are still fighting bias 2 decades after 9/11

Dr. Mohammad Naeem runs the Muslim Center of Westchester. He says while he and his family did not face any direct discrimination after 9/11, friends in other states did.

News 12 Staff

Sep 10, 2021, 9:39 PM

Updated 1,008 days ago

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Some Muslim Americans say they are still fighting bias 20 years after the Sept. 11 terror attacks.
Dr. Mohammad Naeem runs the Muslim Center of Westchester. He says while he and his family did not face any direct discrimination after 9/11, friends in other states did.
"I do have friends in Oklahoma, they felt like patients not coming to them...at that time...but later on they started coming back," he says.
The Scarsdale resident says the U.S. media could be doing more to amplify the long-standing anti-Muslim bias in the country.
"We are equal in my opinion to racism and antisemitism. And they have to take up this issue up more," he says.
He says unlike the 9/11 terrorists, they love this country and what it stands for.
"We are part of this community, we are very loyal and hardworking people, we are like everybody else. We feel home to this country," he says.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Westchester Muslim population currently stands between 10,000 to 15,000 people.


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